Witte de With Contemporary Art
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WdW Review

Building on its long history of framing and instigating debate, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art presents WdW Review, an online platform aimed at informing our ever-expanding spheres of action in an age of constant reformations be they aesthetic, geographic, economic, communal, ecological, and even spiritual. This project seeks to foster a new collegium of knowledge partners in a purpose-built infrastructure so as to address how the world is shaped today as a consequence, or in spite of national, international, and other group ideologies.

The structure of WdW Review is organized around four dedicated sections. The first takes the form of reports from several international editorial desks; the second weaves critical and innovative essays with editorial cartoons; the third invites an author to consider a single image through a speculative piece of writing; the last section layers texts commissioned thematically to address the same time and/or place so as to collectively draw a set of discrete volumes on each context in question respectively.

Our call for such an exchange comes at a time in which policies of economic austerity are pressuring the very resources (magazines, universities, public institutions, and so forth) that could propose alternatives to the threat of social and intellectual bottlenecking. To loosen these restrictions, WdW Review intends to establish itself as a premier forum of intelligent and multi-disciplinary discussion on the humanities, and their role at-large, so as to find not a new, but a greater politics.

Building on its long history of framing and instigating debate, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art presents WdW Review, an online platform aimed at informing our ever-expanding spheres of action in an age of constant reformations be they aesthetic, geographic, economic, communal, ecological, and even spiritual. This project seeks to foster a new collegium of knowledge partners in a purpose-built infrastructure so as to address how the world is shaped today as a consequence, or in spite of national, international, and other group ideologies.

The structure of WdW Review is organized around four dedicated sections. The first takes the form of reports from several international editorial desks; the second weaves critical and innovative essays with editorial cartoons; the third invites an author to consider a single image through a speculative piece of writing; the last section layers texts commissioned thematically to address the same time and/or place so as to collectively draw a set of discrete volumes on each context in question respectively.

Our call for such an exchange comes at a time in which policies of economic austerity are pressuring the very resources (magazines, universities, public institutions, and so forth) that could propose alternatives to the threat of social and intellectual bottlenecking. To loosen these restrictions, WdW Review intends to establish itself as a premier forum of intelligent and multi-disciplinary discussion on the humanities, and their role at-large, so as to find not a new, but a greater politics.

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— Chief Editors
Defne Ayas, Adam Kleinman

— Managing Editor
Orit Gat

— Desk Editors
Natalia Antonova (Moscow), James Bridle (Athens), Ben Eastham (London), Natasha Marie Llorens (Marseille), Gabriela Jauregui (Mexico City), Ruchir Joshi (Delhi/Calcutta), Ana Texeira Pinto (Berlin)

— Emeritus
Yasmine el Rashidi (Cairo), Adam Bobbette (Nusantara), Binnaz Saktanber (Istanbul), Yanis Varoufakis, with vitalspace.org (Athens), Tirdad Zolghadr (Jerusalem)

— Image Editor
Pedro Neves Marques

— Copy Editor
Marnie Slater

— Design
Remco van Bladel

— Programming
Systemantics

— Publisher
Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art Rotterdam, the Netherlands

— Current cover image
Bas Princen ‘Valley II (Amman)’ 2009, courtesy of the artist.

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